Lynn Hummel section The day America quit drinking espresso Detroit Lakes Online

“The denim panic accelerated when denim was faded, denim outfits had to have little patches, and dresses and suits of denim hit the markets. Suddenly, denim disappeared except what the hoarders had hidden away and what little could be found on the what was called the “blue market.” It was ugly and I won’t repeat it now. Obviously, we survived and came out of it.
But it all came back to me when I had a sudden and scary insight into the year 2018 that came to me in a vision of clarity that was terrifying.
But first, a brief glance backward, and this was no vision, it’s history. On November 29, 1942, because of the various pressures and shortages of World War II, President Franklin Roosevelt imposed coffee rationing on the nation. There was plenty of coffee being raised in South and Central America, and sugar rationing was already in effect, but more coffee was needed for our troops and shipping was needed for military purposes.
Coffee stamps were issued and it became impossible by law for one person to purchase more than one pound of coffee in a designated five-week period. That amounted to less than one cup a day.
The panic was immediate. People started recycling coffee grounds which produced a watery beverage they called “Roosevelt coffee.” Coffee substitutes developed, like chicory and Postum (wheat bran, molasses and maltodextrin). People didn’t drink coffee in 1942 like they do today u2014 no gourmet shops u2014 but they needed it immensely.
However, it was a time of war, and there were other rationings as well u2014 gas, butter, milk u2014 and the citizens sucked it up and cooperated, although there was light hearted mention that purple hearts should be awarded to the civilians for their sacrifices.”

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